Intermission – For Better or For Worse: Two Decades of the Jim and Doris Show* (Part 2)

There will be sometimes intermission posts on Our Ancestors II. I am not related to Jamie, but we share the same passion: Keeping the memories of our ancestors alive.

This is part two…

Wanderlustful

So, again, putting together Jim’s street urchin childhood, his parents’ divorce, the five teenage years I have yet to reconstruct, the college plans, the military draft he worried about … marrying my mother, her illness, lifting that wheelchair in and out of the trunk of a car and and him only five foot five, three kids, Vietnam … You’d think that would be enough. You would.

But there’s more! He had a high-stress job too: he flew airplanes most days for the United States Air Force. And let’s not overlook that the military life/protocol itself is high stress.

And yet Jim Clarke had hobbies too. When he was young, he availed himself of the hobby facilities available on base—such as a dark room, where he developed film and made, one year, a photo Christmas card. Like Doris—who played piano and flute, and went to art college for a…

View original post 3,218 more words

Intermission – For Better or For Worse: Two Decades of the Jim and Doris Show* (Part 1)

There will be sometimes intermission posts on Our Ancestors II.

I am not related to Jamie, but we share the same passion: Keeping the memories of our ancestors alive.

Wanderlustful

I got really lucky in the parental sweepstakes. If you know me, you’ve heard me say that more than once. I realized my good fortune pretty early in my life, and the older I get, the more I know it to be true. I still feel like my parents were ahead of their time, although I know I’m looking at it through my personal rose-colored glasses.

For those just joining this history-in-progress, my father, Jim Clarke, was a pilot in the US Air Force, so the family moved around a lot. That is the central fact around which everything in our little five-person family and its history revolves. But the people my parents were—children of the Great Depression, both with rough beginnings**—I believe, was a product of who they were together. The marriage and family they created together, based on their lived experiences, some of…

View original post 2,091 more words